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Journal of Animal Science Abstract -

Value of Peanut Skins (Testa) as a Feed Ingredient for Growing-Finishing Swine

 

This article in JAS

  1. Vol. 53 No. 4, p. 1006-1010
     
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doi:10.2527/jas1981.5341006x
  1. O. M. Hale1 and
  2. W. C. McCormick1,2
  1. University of Georgia, College of Agriculture, Coastal Plain Station, Tifton 317933

Summary

Summary

Thirty-six growing-finishing crossbred pigs (average weight 21.6 kg) were individually housed and fed diets containing 0, 10 or 20% peanut skins (testa) and the value of the skins as a feed ingredient was assessed. Significant linear effects on weight gain and average daily gain (ADG) were obtained with increasing dietary levels of peanut skins. Pigs fed diets containing 20% peanut skins had 15% lower (P<.05) ADG than control pigs. Highly significant curvilinear effects on feed intake and feed required per unit of gain were observed in response to dietary level of peanut skins. Pigs fed diets with 20% peanut skins consumed 23% more (P<.01) feed and required 31% more (P<.01) feed per unit of gain than did controls. Nine barrows (average weight 17.7 kg) were used in a digestion and N balance trial consisting of three 3 × 3 Latin squares such that each pig received each treatment during the trial. Highly significant linear effects on digestion coefficients for dry matter and crude protein due to increasing dietary level of peanut skins were observed. The digestion coefficient for crude protein was reduced (P<.01), by 43% when 20% peanut skins Was added to the diet. Digestion coefficients for ether extract were similar (P>.05) at all dietary levels of peanut skins. Highly significant linear effects on N metabolism were observed with increasing dietary levels of peanut skins. N excreted in urine and N balance were decreased (P<.01) with each increment of peanut skins, while N excreted in the feces was increased (P<.01).

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Copyright © 1981. American Society of Animal ScienceCopyright 1981 by American Society of Animal Science