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Journal of Animal Science Abstract - Ruminant Nutrition

Limiting amino acids for growing lambs fed a diet low in ruminally undegradable protein1

 

This article in

  1. Vol. 86 No. 10, p. 2627-2641
     
    Received: Dec 03, 2007
    Accepted: May 28, 2008
    Published: February 9, 2015


    2 Corresponding author(s): cloest@nmsu.edu
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doi:10.2527/jas.2007-0771
  1. J. van E. Nolte*,
  2. C. A. Löest†2,
  3. A. V. Ferreira*,
  4. J. W. Waggoner and
  5. C. P. Mathis
  1. Department of Animal Sciences, University of Stellenbosch, Matieland 7602, South Africa;
    Department of Animal and Range Sciences, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces 88003; and
    Extension Animal Sciences and Natural Resources Department, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces 88003

Abstract

Ruminally cannulated Rambouillet wether lambs were used in three 6 × 6 Latin square experiments (n = 6/experiment) to determine which essential AA limit N retention. Lambs (BW = 36.9 ± 1.9 kg for Exp. 1, 35.1 ± 1.4 kg for Exp. 2, and 46.0 ± 1.3 kg for Exp. 3) were housed in metabolism crates and limit-fed (DMI = approx. 1.8% of BW daily) twice daily a soybean hull-based diet low in ruminally undegradable protein. Treatments for Exp. 1 were continuous abomasal infusions of a solution (500 mL/d) containing 1) no AA (CON), 2) a mixture of 10 essential AA and 2 nonessential AA (10EAA), 3) 10EAA with Met removed, 4) 10EAA with Lys removed, 5) 10EAA with His removed, and 6) 10EAA with Thr removed. Treatments for Exp. 2 were abomasal infusions of 1) CON, 2) 10EAA, 3) 10EAA with Leu, Ile, and Val removed (–BCAA), 4) 10EAA with Arg removed, 5) 10EAA with Phe removed, and 6) 10EAA with Trp removed. Treatments for Exp. 3 were abomasal infusions of 1) CON, 2) 10EAA, 3) –BCAA, 4) 10EAA with Leu removed, 5) 10EAA with Ile removed, and 6) 10EAA with Val removed. All lambs received continuous infusions of acetate and propionate into the rumen and dextrose into the abomasum to supply additional energy. Periods were 7 d: 3 d for adaptation to abomasally infused treatments and 4 d for fecal and urinary collections. Blood samples were collected 3 h after feeding on d 7. In all 3 experiments, N retention was greater (P < 0.10) for lambs receiving 10EAA vs. CON, demonstrating that the basal AA supply from CON was limiting. Removal of each of the essential AA from 10EAA decreased (P < 0.10) their concentrations in plasma (except for Trp), indicating that 10EAA supplied these AA in excess of the animal’s requirement. In Exp. 1, N retention (g/d) decreased (P < 0.10) in response to the removal of Met and Thr, but was not affected by removal of Lys and His from 10EAA. In Exp. 2, N retention decreased (P < 0.10) in response to removal of all 3 branched-chain AA, Arg, and Trp, whereas the removal of Phe from 10EAA did not affect N retention. In Exp. 3, N retention decreased (P < 0.10) in response to removal of branched-chain AA and Val, but was not affected by the omission of Leu and Ile from 10EAA. The results of this research demonstrated that Met, Thr, Arg, Trp, and Val limited N retention of lambs fed a diet low in ruminally undegradable protein.

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