Search
Author
Title
Vol.
Issue
Year
1st Page

Abstract

 

This article in JAS

  1. Vol. 88 No. 10, p. 3399-3408
     
    Received: Nov 30, 2009
    Accepted: June 04, 2010
    Published: December 4, 2014


    3 Corresponding author(s): Amanda.Weaver@sdstate.edu
 View
 Download
 Share

doi:10.2527/jas.2009-2708

Influence of feeding various quantities of wet and dry distillers grains to finishing steers on carcass characteristics, meat quality, retail-case life of ground beef, and fatty acid profile of longissimus muscle1

  1. T. J. Koger*22,
  2. D. M. Wulf*,
  3. A. D. Weaver 3,
  4. C. L. Wright*,
  5. K. E. Tjardes*44,
  6. K. S. Mateo*,
  7. T. E. Engle,
  8. R. J. Maddock*55 and
  9. A. J. Smart*
  1. Department of Animal and Range Sciences, South Dakota State University, Brookings 57007; and
    Department of Animal Sciences, Colorado State University, Ft. Collins 80523

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT

Two hundred forty Angus crossbred steers were used to determine the influence of feeding various quantities of wet and dry distillers grains to finishing steers on carcass characteristics, meat quality, retail-case life of ground beef, and fatty acid profile of LM. Three replications of 5 dietary treatments were randomly applied to 15 pens in each of 2 yr. A finishing diet containing dry-rolled corn, soybean meal, and alfalfa hay was fed as the control diet. Wet distillers grains with solubles (DGS) or dry DGS was added to the finishing diets at either 20.0 or 40.0% of the dietary DM to replace all soybean meal and part of the cracked corn in treatment diets. Carcasses of steers fed DGS had greater (P < 0.05) fat thickness (1.47 vs. 1.28 cm), greater (P < 0.05) USDA yield grades (3.23 vs. 2.94), and smaller (P < 0.05) percentage of yield grades 1 and 2 (41.1 vs. 60.4%) than carcasses of steers fed the control diet. Longissimus muscle from steers fed dry DGS had greater (P < 0.05) ultimate pH values (5.52 vs. 5.49) than LM from steers fed wet DGS. Ground beef from steers fed DGS had greater (P < 0.05) concentrations of α-tocopherol (1.77 vs. 1.43 μg/g) than ground beef from steers fed the control diet. Ground beef from steers fed 40% DGS had greater (P < 0.05) thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (2.84 vs. 2.13 mg/kg) on d 2 of retail display than ground beef from steers fed 20% DGS. Longissimus muscle of steers fed DGS had less (P < 0.05) C17:0 and more (P < 0.05) C18:0, C18:1t, C16:1c9, C18:2c9c12 (where t is trans and c is cis), and total PUFA than LM of steers fed the control diet. Feedlot steers fed DGS may need to be marketed earlier than normal to avoid excess external fat and carcasses with a greater numerical yield grade. These data suggest feeding DGS to finishing steers will have no adverse or beneficial effects on glycolytic variables (dark cutters), retail display life of ground beef, or meat tenderness. However, beef from cattle finished on diets containing DGS will likely have a greater proportion of PUFA and therefore may be more susceptible to oxidative rancidity.

  Please view the pdf by using the Full Text (PDF) link under 'View' to the left.

Copyright © 2010. American Society of Animal Science