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Journal of Animal Science Abstract - Animal Genetics

Estimation of genetic parameters for mature weight in Angus cattle1

 

This article in JAS

  1. Vol. 89 No. 9, p. 2680-2686
     
    Received: Oct 04, 2010
    Accepted: Mar 31, 2011
    Published: December 4, 2014


    2 Corresponding author(s): maelzo@ufl.edu
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doi:10.2527/jas.2010-3574
  1. R. B. Costa*,
  2. I. Misztal*,
  3. M. A. Elzo 2,
  4. J. K. Bertrand*,
  5. L. O. C. Silva and
  6. M. Łukaszewicz
  1. Department of Animal and Dairy Sciences, University of Georgia, Athens 30602-2771;
    Department of Animal Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville 32611-0910;
    Brazilian Agricultural Research Corporation Beef Cattle, 79002-970, Campo Grande, Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil; and
    Institute of Genetics and Animal Breeding, Jastrzebiec, 05-552 Wolka Kosowska, Poland

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT

The aim of this study was to estimate genetic parameters for BW of Angus cattle up to 5 yr of age and to discuss options for including mature weight (MW) in their genetic evaluation. Data were obtained from the American Angus Association. Only records from herds with at least 500 animals and with >10% of animals with BW at ≥2 yr of age were considered. Traits were weaning weight (WW, n = 81,525), yearling weight (YW, n = 62,721), and BW measured from 2 to 5 yr of age (MW2, n = 15,927; MW3, n = 12,404; MW4, n = 9,805; MW5, n = 7,546). Genetic parameters were estimated using an AIREML algorithm with a multiple-trait animal model. Fixed effects were contemporary group and departure of the actual age from standard age (205, 365, 730, 1,095, 1,460, and 1,825 d of age for WW, YW, MW2, MW3, MW4, and MW5, respectively). Random effects were animal direct additive genetic, maternal additive genetic, maternal permanent environment, and residual. Estimates of direct genetic variances (kg2) were 298 ± 71.8, 563 ± 15.1, 925 ± 52.1, 1,221 ± 65.8, 1,406 ± 80.4, and 1,402 ± 66.9; maternal genetic variances were 167 ± 4.8, 153 ± 6.1, 123 ± 9.1, 136 ± 12.25, 167 ± 18.0, and 110 ± 14.0; maternal permanent environment variances were 124 ± 2.9, 120 ± 4.3, 61 ± 7.5, 69 ± 11.9, 103 ± 15.9, and 134 ± 35.2; and residual variances were 258 ± 3.8, 608 ± 8.6, 829 ± 34.2, 1,016 ± 38.8, 1,017 ± 52.1, and 1,202 ± 63.22 for WW, YW, MW2, MW3, MW4, and MW5, respectively. The direct genetic correlation between WW and YW was 0.84 ± 0.14 and between WW and MW ranged from 0.66 ± 0.06 (WW and MW4) to 0.72 ± 0.11 (WW and MW2). Direct genetic correlations ranged from 0.77 ± 0.08 (YW and MW5) to 0.85 ± 0.07 (YW and MW2) between YW and MW, and they were ≥0.95 among MW2, MW3, MW4, and MW5. Maternal genetic correlations between WW and YW and MW ranged from 0.52 ± 0.05 (WW and MW4) to 0.95 ± 0.07 (WW and YW), and among MW they ranged from 0.54 ± 0.14 (MW4 and MW5) to 0.94 ± 0.07 (MW2 and MW3). Genetic correlations suggest that a genetic evaluation for MW may be MW2-based and that including BW from older ages could be accomplished by adjusting records to the scale of MW2.

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