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Journal of Animal Science Abstract - Animal Nutrition

An evaluation of the effects of added vitamin D3 in maternal diets on sow and pig performance12

 

This article in JAS

  1. Vol. 92 No. 2, p. 594-603
     
    Received: June 11, 2013
    Accepted: Nov 19, 2013
    Published: November 24, 2014


    4 Corresponding author(s): Goodband@ksu.edu
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doi:10.2527/jas.2013-6792
  1. J. R. Flohr*,
  2. M. D. Tokach*,
  3. S. S. Dritz*33,
  4. J. M. DeRouchey*,
  5. R. D. Goodband 4,
  6. J. L. Nelssen* and
  7. J. R. Bergstrom
  1. Department of Animal Sciences and Industry, Kansas State University, Manhattan 66506;
    DSM Nutritional Products Inc., Parsippany, NJ 07054

Abstract

A total of 84 sows (PIC 1050) and their litters were used to determine the effects of supplementing maternal diet with vitamin D3 on sow and pig performance, serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 (25(OH)D3), milk vitamin D3, neonatal bone mineralization, and neonatal tissue vitamin D3. After breeding, sows were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 dietary vitamin D3 treatments (1,500, 3,000, or 6,000 IU/kg of complete diets). Sows were bled on d 0 and 100 of gestation and at farrowing and weaning (d 21). Pig BW was recorded at birth and weaning, and serum was collected from 2 pigs/litter at birth, on d 10 and at weaning. A total of 54 pigs (18/treatment) were euthanized at birth and necropsied to sample bones and tissues. Sow and suckling pig performance and neonatal bone ash and bone density did not differ among maternal vitamin D3 treatments; however, sow 25(OH)D3 and milk vitamin D3 increased (linear, P < 0.01) with increasing maternal vitamin D3 supplementation. Piglet serum 25(OH)D3 increased (quadratic, P < 0.03) with increased maternal vitamin D3. Neonatal kidney vitamin D3 tended (quadratic, P = 0.08) to decrease with increasing maternal vitamin D3, but liver vitamin D3 tended (linear, P = 0.09) to increase with increasing maternal vitamin D3. At weaning, a subsample of 180 pigs (PIC 327 × 1050) were used in a 3 × 2 split plot design for 35 d to determine the effects of maternal vitamin D3 and 2 levels of dietary vitamin D3 (1,800 or 18,000 IU/kg) from d 0 to 10 postweaning on nursery growth and serum 25(OH)D3. Overall (d 0 to 35), nursery ADG and G:F were not affected by either concentration of vitamin D3, but ADFI tended (quadratic, P < 0.06) to decrease with increasing maternal vitamin D3 as pigs from sows fed 3,000 IU had lower ADFI compared with pigs from sows fed 1,500 or 6,000 IU/kg. Nursery pig serum 25(OH)D3 increased with increasing maternal vitamin D3 (weaning) on d 0 (linear, P < 0.01), and maternal × diet interactions (P < 0.01) were observed on d 10 and 21 because pigs from sows fed 1,500 IU had greater increases in serum 25(OH)D3 when fed 18,000 IU compared with pigs from sows fed 3,000 IU. In conclusion, sow and pig serum 25(OH)D3, milk vitamin D3, and neonatal tissue vitamin D3 can be increased by increasing maternal vitamin D3, and nursery pig 25(OH)D3 can be increased by increasing dietary vitamin D3; however, sow and pig performance and neonatal bone mineralization was not influenced by increasing vitamin D3 dietary levels.

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