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Journal of Animal Science Abstract - Animal Production

Effects of diet form and feeder adjustment on growth performance of nursery and finishing pigs1

 

This article in JAS

  1. Vol. 93 No. 8, p. 4172-4180
     
    Received: Feb 19, 2015
    Accepted: June 12, 2015
    Published: July 24, 2015


    2 Corresponding author(s): Goodband@ksu.edu
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doi:10.2527/jas.2015-9028
  1. J. E. Nemechek*,
  2. M. D. Tokach*,
  3. S. S. Dritz,
  4. E. D. Fruge,
  5. E. L. Hansen,
  6. R. D. Goodband 2*,
  7. J. M. DeRouchey* and
  8. J. C. Woodworth*
  1. * Department of Animal Sciences and Industry, College of Agriculture, Kansas State University, Manhattan 66506-0201
     Department of Diagnostic Medicine/Pathobiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Kansas State University, Manhattan 66506-0201
     Hubbard Feeds, Mankato, MN 56002

Abstract

Three experiments were conducted to determine the effects of feeder adjustment and diet form on growth performance of nursery (Exp. 1 and 2) and finishing (Exp. 3) pigs. Treatments were arranged as a 2 × 3 factorial with the main effects of feeder adjustment and diet form. The 2 feeder adjustments were a narrow and wide feeder adjustment (minimum gap opening of 1.27 and 2.54 cm, respectively). The 3 diet forms were meal, poor-quality pellets (70% pellets and 30% fines for Exp. 1 and 2 and 50% pellets and 50% fines for Exp. 3), and screened pellets with minimal fines (3 to 10%). In Exp. 1, 210 pigs (initially 11.9 kg BW) were used in a 21-d trial with 7 pigs per pen and 5 pens per treatment. No feeder adjustment × diet form interactions were observed. There were no differences in ADG, ADFI, or G:F due to feeder adjustment. Pigs fed the meal diet had increased (P < 0.05) ADG and ADFI compared with pigs fed the poor-quality or screened pellets. Pigs fed meal or poor-quality pellets had decreased (P < 0.05) G:F compared with pigs fed screened pellets. In Exp. 2, 1,005 nursery pigs (initially 14.1 kg BW) were used in a 28-d trial with 26 to 28 pigs per pen and 6 pens per treatment. Pigs fed from the narrow feeder adjustment had decreased (P < 0.05) ADG and ADFI compared with pigs fed from the wide adjustment with no differences in G:F. Pigs fed the meal diet had decreased (P < 0.05) ADG compared with pigs fed poor-quality or screened pellets. Pigs fed meal or poor-quality pellets had decreased (P < 0.05) G:F compared with pigs fed screened pellets. In Exp. 3, 246 pigs (initially 56.8 kg BW) were used in a 69-d trial with 5 pens per treatment and 6 or 7 pigs per pen. Overall, ADFI decreased (P < 0.05) and G:F increased (P < 0.05) for pigs fed from the narrow adjusted feeders compared with the wide adjustment with no differences in ADG. Overall, pigs fed meal diets tended to have decreased (P < 0.10) ADG and had decreased (P < 0.05) G:F compared with pigs fed screened pellets; ADG and G:F in those fed poor-quality pellets were intermediate. Feeding meal or poor-quality pellets increased (P < 0.05) ADFI compared with pigs fed screened pellets. In conclusion, feeding nursery pigs from a wide feeder gap may increase ADG and ADFI with no negative effects on G:F. For finishing pigs, reducing feeder gap reduced feed disappearance and improved G:F. In all experiments, the greatest G:F improvements from pelleting were observed when the percentage of fines was minimized.

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