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Journal of Animal Science Abstract - Animal Nutrition

Evaluating the impact of maternal vitamin D supplementation on sow performance: II. Subsequent growth performance and carcass characteristics of growing pigs12

 

This article in JAS

  1. Vol. 94 No. 11, p. 4643-4653
     
    Received: Feb 23, 2016
    Accepted: Aug 20, 2016
    Published: October 7, 2016


    4 Corresponding author(s): goodband@ksu.edu
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doi:10.2527/jas.2016-0410
  1. J. R. Flohr*33,
  2. J. C. Woodworth*,
  3. J. R. Bergstrom,
  4. M. D. Tokach*,
  5. S. S. Dritz,
  6. R. D. Goodband 4* and
  7. J. M. DeRouchey*
  1. * Department of Animal Sciences and Industry, College of Agriculture, Kansas State University, Manhattan 66506-020
     DSM Nutritional Products, Parsippany, NJ 07054
     Department of Diagnostic Medicine/Pathobiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Kansas State University, Manhattan 66506-020

Abstract

A of subsample of 448 growing pigs (PIC 327 × 1050) weaned from 52 sows fed varying dietary vitamin D regimens were used in a split-plot design to determine the effects of maternal and nursery dietary vitamin D on growth performance. Sows were previously administered diets containing vitamin D as vitamin D3 (800, 2,000, or 9,600 IU/kg) or as 25(OH)D3 (50 µg [or 2,000 IU vitamin D equivalent]/kg from HyD; DSM Nutritional Products, Parsippany, NJ). Once weaned, pigs were allotted to pens on the basis of previous maternal vitamin D treatment, and then pens were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 nursery vitamin D dietary regimens (2,000 IU of vitamin D3/kg or 50 µg 25(OH)D3/kg). Pigs remained on nursery vitamin D treatments for 35 d, and then they were provided common finishing diets until market (135 kg). Growing pig serum 25(OH)D3 suggested that maternal dietary vitamin D influenced (P < 0.001 at weaning) serum concentrations early after weaning, but nursery vitamin D regimen had a larger impact (P < 0.001) on d 17 and 35 postweaning. Overall growth performance was not influenced by nursery vitamin D dietary treatments. From d 0 to 35 in the nursery, pigs from sows fed increasing vitamin D3 had increased (quadratic, P < 0.003) ADG and ADFI, but G:F was similar regardless of maternal vitamin D regimen. Also, pigs from sows fed 50 µg/kg of 25(OH)D3 had increased (P = 0.002) ADG compared with pigs weaned from sows fed 800 IU of vitamin D3. Throughout finishing (d 35 postweaning until 135 kg), ADG was increased (quadratic, P = 0.005) and G:F was improved (quadratic, P = 0.049) with increasing maternal dietary vitamin D3. Also, pigs from sows fed 50 µg/kg of 25(OH)D3 had increased (P = 0.002) ADG compared with pigs weaned from sows fed 800 IU of vitamin D3. Carcass data were collected from a subsample population separate from that used for the growth performance portion of the study, and a total of 642 carcasses from progeny of sows fed the varying dietary vitamin D treatments were used. Live BW of pigs at marketing and HCW were heavier (P < 0.030) for pigs from sows previously fed 25(OH)D3 compared with pigs from sows fed 9,600 IU of vitamin D3. Overall, pigs from sows fed 2,000 IU of vitamin D3 grew faster after weaning compared with pigs from sows fed 800 or 9,600 IU of vitamin D3. Pigs from sows fed 25(OH)D3 hag greater ADG compared with pigs from sows fed 800 IU of vitamin D3, and they had increased final BW and HCW compared with pigs from sows fed 9,600 IU of vitamin D3.

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