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This article in JAS

  1. Vol. 95 No. 4, p. 1521-1527
     
    Received: Nov 29, 2016
    Accepted: Jan 17, 2017
    Published: April 13, 2017


    2 Corresponding author(s): bwhite@vet.k-state.edu
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doi:10.2527/jas.2016.1254

A retrospective analysis of risk factors associated with bovine respiratory disease treatment failure in feedlot cattle1

  1. T. D. Avra*,
  2. K. M. Abell,
  3. D. D. Shane,
  4. M. E. Theurer,
  5. R. L. Larson*‡ and
  6. B. J. White 2*‡
  1. * Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Kansas State University, Manhattan 66506
     Department of Diagnostic Medicine/Pathobiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Kansas State University, Manhattan 66506
     Beef Cattle Institute, Kansas State University, Manhattan 66506

Abstract

The objective of this project was to identify risk factors associated with the probability of failing to resolve clinical signs of bovine respiratory disease (BRD) after initial antimicrobial treatment. A retrospective data analysis was performed with 194,062 animals treated for BRD with an antimicrobial from 10 U.S. feedlots from 2005 to 2009. A binary variable classified cattle as a treatment failure if they were retreated for BRD or died following an initial BRD treatment. A generalized logistic mixed model was created to evaluate associations of quarter of the year at feedlot arrival, arrival weight, sex, risk classification (high vs. low), days on feed at first BRD treatment, and rectal temperature at first BRD treatment and all 2-way interactions with the probability of first treatment failure for BRD. A total of 64,683 out of 194,062 (33.3%) of cattle initially treated for BRD were classified as treatment failures due to death or retreatment. Multiple 2-way interactions were present. High-risk calves had greater probability of first treatment failure compared with low-risk calves, but this effect was modified by quarter of arrival, days on feed at first treatment, and rectal temperature category. The effect of arrival weight category was modified by days on feed at first treatment of BRD and quarter of arrival for probability of first treatment failure. Multiple arrival and treatment characteristics were associated with the probability of first BRD treatment failure. Knowledge of these factors can lead future prospective studies to improve the prediction of treatment failure and provide baseline results for the industry.

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